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Freiherr von Lüttwitz, German general, portrait / photo
Lüttwitz, Walther Freiherr von.
German officer (commanding general during World War I, 1919–20 commander-in-chief of the German Reichswehr in Berlin and the Marken),...
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Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
German Reich, Ruhrgebiet 1920
German Reich
Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
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1920 The Kapp Putsch
13th – 17th March 2020 - 100th Anniversary.

The Kapp Putsch, also known as the Kapp-Lüttwitz Putsch after its leaders Wolfgang Kapp and Walther von Lüttwitz, was an attempted coup on 13 March 1920 which aimed to undo the German Revolution of 1918–1919, overthrow the Weimar Republic and establish a right-wing autocratic government in its place. It was supported by parts of the Reichswehr (military) and other conservative, nationalist and monarchist factions.

Although the putsch has been named after Wolfgang Kapp, a 62-year-old nationalist East Prussian civil servant, who had been planning a coup against the republic for a while, it was instigated by the military; Kapp only played a supporting role.

Members of the elected government under Friedrich Ebert were determined to defend the republic, but the head of the military refused to cooperate. There were street fights between workers and Freikorps troops in Kiel, Hanover, Leibzig and the Ruhr region. In the aftermath the Ruhr region was shaken by an uprising of mainly communist workers.

The putsch had started on 13th March 1920 and collapsed after 5 days, but the trust of the republic in its military leaders was deeply shaken.